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Tablecloth

Artist Statement

In my artistic exploration, I transcend the conventional boundaries of the canvas through my repetitive backgrounds and composition-cropping frames. Gingham, with its distinct checkered motif, carries a sense of familiarity and nostalgia. Its origins trace back to rural landscapes, where it adorned aprons, tablecloths, and garments, becoming intertwined with the fabric of everyday life. Each intersecting line, each square of color, represents a thread connecting tradition with contemporary perspectives in my subject matter. By seamlessly integrating a Baroque style frame onto the gingham background, I blur the distinction between the artwork and its surrounding border. The Baroque frame, renowned for its opulence and decorative craftsmanship, has long been associated with the presentation of significant artworks. Traditionally, it served as an adornment, framing the subject matter and elevating its perceived value. I reimagine the frame as an element that not only encloses the composition, but also becomes an active participant with it.The frame serves as a metaphorical portal, offering glimpses into the inner worlds that exist beyond the frame's physical confines.

My recent work explores the beach as a place of spectacle that exemplifies a panopticon. The beach, traditionally associated with respite and freedom, takes on a different dimension when viewed through this lens. Drawing from the concept developed by Jeremy Bentham, the panopticon represents a structure of surveillance, where individuals are under constant observation without their knowledge. In this context, the sun-drenched shores and vast expanses of sand become a visual hunting ground for non consensual and inconspicuous people-watching. I invite viewers to contemplate the multifaceted layers of perception, power, and surveillance that shape our interactions within the coastal experience. Symbolism and metaphor play a crucial role in my artistic expression. Elements such as lifeguard towers, beachgoers, and reflections become potent symbols that embody the panoptic gaze. Through the portrayal of anonymous figures, fragmented narratives, and distorted perspectives, I aim to dismantle the illusion of carefree leisure at the beach that influences our behavior and self-regulation.

It Takes Two, 2022

Digital Print

18 x 24 inches

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